Ma-i-san  마이산
Still  Under  Construction
마이산(전북 진안):
http://www.koreasanha.net/san/mai.htm
마이산 has two big peaks. One being
slightly bigger than the other, the two similar
shape of the peak was named, “horse’s ear.”
The one on the east is called East peak or
Male
마이 peak. The other one is called
West peak or Female
마이 peak.
Ma-i-san  Ok-su-sa
[Horse-Ears Mountain  Jade-Water Temple]
North Jeolla Province,  Spring 1999
(see also my book, pages 167-169)


The strangest looking
peaks in all Korea,
thrusting up like
mighty Earth-spirits,
out in a fairly flat
farming region.  Seen
here from the south
(left) and the north
(right) in 1999.  
Made of rough, pitted
volcanic stone.  Long
a sacred place; now a
Provincial Park.
LEFT: a new shot of Tap-sa
[Pagoda Temple] at the
base of Ma-i-san
[Horse-Ears Mtn] in North
Jeolla Province, featured
on pages 167-169 of my
First Edition. The San-shin-
gak can barely be seen to
the right of the Main Hall.
ABOVE: Portrait of Korea's first
king Dan-gun; note the
leaf-mantles (two different
species!) on his shoulders and
waist.  Refer to pages 132-139 in my book.

BELOW:  a statue of a San-shin-dosa (see pages
28-29) in that same sextagonal shrine.


ABOVE: a painting of the Ma-i-san-shin giving a
magical sword to Yi Seong-gye, who used it to take
over Korea and become founder of the Joseon
Dynasty as Yi Taejo in 1392. Yi is said to have
prayed to this San-shin in a cave there for 100
days, before he appeared.  A painting of Yi Taejo
as himself the San-shin of Ma-i-san is on page 34
of my book; after death he joined his "teacher" and
took over the status.. He is a common deity used in
Korean Shamanism, but this is the only mountain
which he is regarded as the San-shin of.  That
great icon is now stashed away by the abbot, for
security.

One more time,
the amazing Tap-sa!
NEXT --->
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New Discoveries Index Page
(see also my book, pages 167-169)


RIGHT: Ok-su-sa
[Jade Water Temple] further up the trail, right
between the two bizzare peaks. The sextagonal
shrine up front is for icons of two Founder-Kings: Yi
Taejo & Dan-gun (photos below).
ABOVE: Portrait of Korea's first
king Dan-gun; note the leaf-mantles (two
different species!) on his shoulders and
waist.  Refer to pages 132-139 in my
book.

BELOW:  a statue of a San-shin-dosa
(see pages 28-29) in that same
sextagonal shrine.